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  • Writer's pictureSimon Basten

Pino Wilson

Updated: Nov 10, 2023

Giuseppe Wilson, better known as Pino, is the Lazio captain, period. Nobody else has ever, since or before him, interpreted the leadership role both on and off the pitch like he did. He was called the “padrino” (godfather) because of how he managed things within the team. He was also the best “libero” Italy has even had, perhaps on a par with Franco Baresi.

Source Wikipedia

Wilson was born in Darlington in the England on October 2,7 1945, son of a British NATO officer and Neapolitan mother. They soon moved to Naples when Pino was very young and it was in the Campania capital that he started playing football. At first he did not say anything to his parents (and, as written in his biography, certainly not to nonna) since they were very keen on him having a career in law, but he managed to sneak out and play. Eventually he got caught but he promised he would continue to study if given permission to continue playing. So after having played for a local club, Juvenapoli, in 1964 he started his football adventure and signed for CRAL Cirio, a club of the local agricultural company that played in Serie D. The year before he had refused to go and play for Lazio, since he considered himself too young and because he wanted to finish school. After having made 18 appearances, the club was absorbed by Internapoli, a new team with big ambitions.


In his first year he made 32 appearances, 34 in his second. In 1966 he even played for Lazio for a couple of games in a local tournament. At the end of that experience he went back to Naples and helped Internapoli get promoted to Serie C.


In 1967-68 a new kid arrived in the squad. He was big, fat, ugly, awkward and had an ego bigger than Naples. His name was Giorgio Chinaglia. They became friends for life.


In 1968-69, thanks also to manager Luis Vinicio, Internapoli almost made it to Serie B, arriving third and just missing out. Occasionally in the stands watching the game was Enrique Flamini, a Lazio scout and former player, acting on behalf of Juan Carlos Lorenzo, the Biancoceleste manager. In the summer of 1969 Wilson and Chinaglia signed for Lazio.


Lazio 1969-70. Wilson is fourth from left sitting. Source Wikipedia

Wilson wrote in his biography that the impact with Rome and Lazio was overwhelming. From a small minor club to a big team. He was very unsure of his capabilities when Lorenzo told him to go on the pitch in the Coppa Italia match against Ternana on September 3 1969. The impact with top flight football was devastating. He was sure he had failed and was not up to playing in Serie A. He called his former club and told them he wanted to go back and pleaded with them to do anything they could to re-sign him in the autumn transfer window.


He was so convinced he was going back to Naples that the weight on his shoulders was lifted so, when he debuted in Serie A against Torino substituting Giuseppe Massa during the interval, he almost did not care what would happen. But the support of the fans gave him courage and, as the game progressed, he felt more and more confident. He played that match well, plus the other 28 league games that season (out of 30). Pino Wilson became a first choice player and even hoped to be one of the 40 players on the initial list for the World Cup of 1970. He wasn’t, but Chinaglia was.


The 1970-71 season was a disaster for Lazio. Big clashes between President Umberto Lenzini and Lorenzo maimed the team and created an uneasy atmosphere. The Biancocelesti finished 15th and were relegated. It was not his fault, obviously, since he had played well during the year, but it was a big blow.


Lorenzo was sacked and in came Tommaso Maestrelli. The Maestro convinced Lenzini not to sell him nor Chinaglia because he wanted to build the new team around them. Noticing his leadership qualities both on the pitch and off, the new manager made Wilson captain. Pino was a serious chap, he studied law in his spare time, both the squad and the President always asked for his opinion on things. He was the ideal captain. In the 1971-72 season, Lazio took time to get into gear but they did manage to get promoted at the end of the season.


The beginning of the 1972-73 season was dismal. The Coppa Italia games, which in those days preceded the start of the Campionato, were just plain awful. Three defeats and one goalless draw. But then things got going. After five games Lazio were joint top with Milan, Roma and Inter. In the seventh, after beating Palermo 2-0, they took solitary command of Serie A and stayed there until game 10 when they drew 0-0 at Genoa against Sampdoria. One has to remember that the last time Lazio were solitary leaders in the Italian Serie A so late in the league was on January 10, 1937.


On Sunday December 17, there was the clash between Milan and Lazio as well as Roma and Inter. Neither of the games finished. The Milan match was suspended due to fog, and the Rome match suspended due to the continuing pitch invasion by angry Roma supporters. The referee had given a penalty to the Neroazzurri in the 90th minute for a foul on Sandro Mazzola that the Roma players claimed was outside the box. After Roberto Boninsegna scored, all hell let loose and Inter were awarded a 2-0 victory. Eventually Lazio lost the replay 3-1 and after a few draws ended the first half of the season in third place together with Inter (who had one game in hand) and one point behind leaders Milan and Juventus.


In the first three games of the second half Lazio drew in Milan to Inter, at home to Fiorentina and lost to Juventus. Milan and the Bianconeri now had a four-point lead over the Biancocelesti and Inter. Then Lazio won eight consecutive games with the final victory against leaders Milan. Four games to go, Milan and Lazio had 39 points, Juventus 37. In the next games the Biancocelesti drew against Torino, Juve and the Rossoneri won. Milan 41, Lazio 40, Juventus 39. With three games to go the Biancocelesti drew at Bologna, Milan at Torino and the Bianconeri won in Bergamo. Milan 42, Juventus and Lazio 41. All three of them won the last but one game so the positions stayed the same coming into the last match of the season.


The final three games were Verona-Milan, Napoli-Lazio and Roma Juventus. At the end of the first half the results were Verona-Milan 3-1, Roma-Juventus 1-0, Napoli-Lazio still goalless. As a consequence the table read Milan and Lazio 44, Juventus 43. But everything changed in the second half as Juve overcame the deficit and won while Lazio lost in the final minutes of the game. Juventus won the scudetto.


A big blow for the club.


“Mr. Wilson, who should I buy in the summer to make the team stronger?” asked Lenzini. “Mr. President, if you keep the team as it is, we’ll win the scudetto”, replied the captain. And this was exactly what happened.


The season started with the Coppa Italia in late August. Lazio had won one (Varese), lost one (Brescia) and drawn one (Roma) so, in order to go through to the second group phase, they had to win 4-0 against Novara. They scored six and qualified.


In the first match of Serie A, the Biancocelesti had won at Vicenza 3-1. In the second they beat Sampdoria in the final minutes with Wilson's first goal for the club.



In the UEFA Cup, Lazio faced Sion in the first round: 3-0 was money in the bank. In the return game Lazio scored immediately with Garlaschelli and switched off. The Swiss won 3-1 but scored their last goal in the 90th minute. Second round was against Ipswich Town. The first leg in England was a disaster, 4-0. Only a miracle could allow Lazio to go through, but the players were absolutely convinced they could at least take the opponents to extra time. Lazio scored after 48 seconds with Garlaschelli. In the 23rd minute Allan Hunter, a defender, saved a goal on the line with a deliberate handball. The referee Leo Van der Kroft (who the Lazio players accused of having had a little too much to drink before the game) did not give the Biancocelesti the spot kick. Chinaglia two minutes later made it 2-0. In the second half Lazio doubled their efforts but could not score their third. In the 75th minute Clive Woods dived in the box and the referee gave a penalty. All hell let loose. The referee was surrounded by the Lazio players, some allegedly even hit him. Ipswich scored and from then on the game became a battle on the pitch and in the stands. It even continued in the changing rooms with a massive brawl among the players caused by one of the Ipswich players calling the Italians bastards. Lazio won 4-2 but were eliminated. UEFA banned Lazio from Europe for three years, reduced to one on appeal.


In Campionato after the Sampdoria game, Lazio drew three (Fiorentina, Cesena and Inter) and lost one to Juventus. With two points per win they were fifth but only two points behind leaders Napoli and one behind Inter, Juventus and Fiorentina. They then won the next six (Cagliari, Roma, Napoli, Verona, Milan and Genoa), taking the top spot in the table after the ninth game together with Juventus and Napoli and solitary first from the next game. The derby was spectacular with Lazio winning coming from behind, thanks to fresh signing Paolo Franzoni's first touch of ball for his new team.


They were then caught up by Juventus after losing at home against Torino but took back solitary first place after winning at Foggia and Juve losing in Florence. In the last game of the first part of the season, a 4-0 win against Bologna, gave the Biancocelesti a three-point lead.


The second half of the season started with a win against Vicenza but then the Biancocelesti lost at Genoa against Sampdoria. Juventus were two points behind and the next game was Lazio-Juventus.


The Biancocelesti faced the mother of all games without Re Cecconi injured, replaced by Fausto Inselvini who had arrived in the autumn transfer window, an excellent all rounder who could basically play anywhere. Lazio crushed the Bianconeri, went ahead 2-0 and could have scored more. Two controversial penalties were awarded to Juventus in the second half, the first one saved by Pulici but not the second. The Biancocelesti reacted, created a massive chance with Long John and then scored their third thanks to a Chinaglia penalty. Lazio top, three points clear of Napoli and four ahead of Juventus.


The lead remained the same for the next two games (draw in Florence and win over Cesena) and reduced by one when Lazio lost against Inter. The +3 returned after a week thanks to a 2-0 win over Cagliari. The Biancocelesti then beat Roma for the second time, again coming from behind, taking them to a +4 lead.


The next two games were remarkable. In the first, away to Napoli, Lazio fell behind three times and managed to equalise every time thanks to a Chinaglia hat trick. In the second, against Verona at home, at the end of the first half the Biancocelesti were losing 2-1. Lazio had played well, had had numerous chances, but been unlucky. On entering the changing rooms at the interval, Maestrelli refused to open the doors and sent the players back out on the pitch. The crowd could not believe it. Why had they come back on to play so early? There were more than 10 minutes to go until the beginning of the second half. After a few minutes of bewilderment, the fans got it and started to shout Lazio-Lazio. They did that for the entire interval so when Verona came back onto the pitch, they saw the Lazio players already raring to go and the crowd all wound up, it was like walking into a den unarmed against 50,000 lions. In the second half the Biancocelesti ripped them apart and won 4-2.


A goalless draw in Milan allowed Juventus to pull a point back but Lazio then won the next game against Genoa. Three games to go, three point lead. The Biancocelesti lost to Torino 2-1 but Juventus lost too. Two games to go. If Lazio beat Foggia at home, the scudetto was theirs.


Against Foggia, paralysed by fear, the Biancocelesti possibly played their worst game so far, but won thanks to a Chinaglia penalty. The scudetto was won, the first in the club's 74-year history. The final game at Bologna was basically a friendly and ended 2-2.


Lazio played the most exciting football, had a bunch of wild players who fitted perfectly together, managed by the Maestro. Pulici, Petrelli, Martini, Wilson, Oddi Nanni, Garlaschelli, Re Cecconi, Chinaglia, Frustalupi, D’Amico plus Inselvini, Facco, Polentes, Franzoni and Manservisi. Heroes and legends that will never be forgotten.


Source Wikipedia

During the course of 1974 Wilson also played for Italy. He was called for the friendly against West Germany played at the Stadio Olimpico. With Lazio having won the scudetto, it was thought that a lot of Biancocelesti would be part of the Italian squad for the 1974 World Cup. In the end they were just three: Wilson, Chinaglia and Re Cecconi. Luigi Martini would probably also have joined but he suffered a serious injury in Lazio Foggia and missed out.


Source WIkipedia

Chinaglia was not pleased. He thought that a lot more of his team mates deserved being called and voiced his opinion. He was right. Out of the 22 Italian players 6 were from Juventus (who had come second in 1973-74), 5 from Inter (4th), 3 from Milan (7th) and Lazio, 2 from Cagliari (10th) and Torino (5th) and one from Napoli (3rd). Lazio’s hopeful expectations were based on the fact that at Mexico 1970, Italy coach Ferruccio Valcareggi had selected six Cagliari players who had just won the scudetto, but this time he followed a more “diplomatic” strategy. There was strong pressure from the northern media to favour Italian players and the Gazzetta dello Sport strongly pushed Valcareggi to play with Pietro Anastasi from Juventus rather than Giorgio. Italy’s first game was against Haiti. But the team, slow and badly prepared, surprisingly fell behind. Italy managed to score twice but Chinaglia had not received a decent ball the entire match. When Valcareggi substituted him with Anastasi in the 69th minute, Chinaglia ran back into the changing rooms blatantly telling the head coach to F off.


All hell let loose. The northern papers jumped at the fact that they now had a culprit for a possible Italian failure. Wilson suggested they call Maestrelli in to try and calm Giorgio. He did and managed to convince him to keep quiet and not let matters get worse. In the meantime Wilson appeared in the second game against Argentina, coming on in the second half. Italy drew 1-1. The final group match was against Poland who were one of the surprises of the tournament and were already qualified. The Azzurri, with Chinaglia up front and during the course of the game also with Wilson, lost 2-1 and were out.


Wilson never played for Italy again, almost certainly due to the fact that he was Chinaglia’s friend. When Fulvio Bernardini took over he played a training match against Reggiana and the former Lazio manager even made him captain. Wilson thought that his career in Nazionale would continue but in the next game against Yugoslavia, Bernardini moved Giacinto Facchetti from left back to libero. The Lazio captain asked why he would do such a thing since he was certainly more apt for the role. Wilson was never called up again. Voicing dissent was something one could not do in the Nazionale, and the punishment was a ban for life.


The 1974-75 season was going OK, Lazio were no longer the force to be reckoned with of the previous two years but they did well. At the end of the first half of the season they were second, three points behind Juventus. With six games to the end of the season the Biancocelesti were third together with Roma, two points behind Napoli and four from Juventus. But then came the tragic news: Mastrelli had cancer and not long to live. The team collapsed at home to Torino and lost all focus. They managed to arrive fourth but things were never going to be the same. They were not only losing their manager, but a leader, a father figure to them all.


Lenzini, following some disastrous advice by new manager Giulio Corsini, in the summer sold Mario Frustalupi, Giancarlo Oddi and Franco Nanni. Chinaglia, tired of being harassed by most of the country following what he did in Germany, wanted to leave for the US and play for New York Cosmos. The team that was so beautiful to watch was no more. Corsini lasted just seven games and Maestrelli returned, seemingly cured. But Lazio had been built badly and had trouble all year. With four games to the end of the season Lazio were third from bottom, one point behind Sampdoria and Ascoli. Three teams went down (two points for victory). The Biancocelesti had to play against Torino who were the Serie A leaders. Lazio scored in the second half but an unfortunate own goal with 60 seconds to go gave Torino the equaliser. With three games left, Cagliari were doomed on 15 points, Como had 18, Lazio and Sampdoria 20, Ascoli 21 and Verona 22. This was Chinaglia’s last game for Lazio. On that evening he left to join New York Cosmos.


Lazio lost the next match 4-3 in Florence. So now Como and Lazio were on 20, Ascoli 21, Verona and Sampdoria 22. Lazio needed to beat AC Milan in the last game at home and they did. Not only, they literally destroyed Milan, scored four goals and they could have scored many more. Como had 20 points, Lazio, Sampdoria and Ascoli 22, Verona 23. Last match at Como. After 15 minutes Lazio was losing 2-0, but they managed to equalise and avoid relegation.


In the summer of 1976, Luis Vinicio became the new manager. The team was filled with young promises from the Primavera team, some of which had debuted the year before: Bruno Giordano, Lionello Manfredonia and Andrea Agostinelli. Some scudetto heroes were still there: Felice Pulici, Luigi Martini, Luciano Re Cecconi, Renzo Garlaschelli and captain Wilson. They were joined by former Roma captain Ciccio Cordova who signed for Lazio to spite the new presidency who did not want him anymore. The Biancocelesti did very well and reached a UEFA Cup qualification. But the winter was marred by tragedy. First Maestrelli died and then Re Cecconi was victim of the most absurd death that one could remember. Walking into a friend’s jewellers shop he was shot to death by the owner. It looked like a prank gone wrong but there was a lot more to it that still has not come out.


After a good year, the players got tired of Vinicio and 1977-78 was not a good year but Lazio were able to avoid relegation. The manager was sacked during the season and the team was handed over to Bob Lovati. In the summer Wilson was invited to play for New York Cosmos by his friend Chinaglia. They won the Super Bowl and Wilson was voted MVP of the final. Giorgio wanted him to stay, but Wilson, despite the enormous sum of money offered, decided to go back to Lazio, his home. Chinaglia was not pleased.


The 1978-79 season under Lovati saw Lazio miss out on a UEFA Cup qualification by just a few points. Lenzini did not have much money to invest and did what he financially could to keep the team competitive. The 1979-80 season should have followed the previous one, with the objective of a UEFA Cup qualification as best case scenario, survival in Serie A in the worst case. But the season was marred right from the start. On October 28 there was the Paparelli tragedy.


On October 28 Rome was ready for the first derby of the season. An hour before the match, Vincenzo Paparelli was sitting in Curva Nord having a sandwich. From the Curva Sud Giovanni Fiorillo fired two flares towards the Lazio Curva. They zig zagged over the top. For the third attempt, the Roma supporter lowered his aim. The flare hit Vincenzo Paparelli in the eye and killed him. He was 33 years of age and had two children.


What happened then was complete chaos. The Lazio fans did not want the game to go on but the police decided that it was best to play for security reasons. In a climate of warfare with few Lazio supporters left in the stands, the game was played. Every time the ball went into the stands with Lazio supporters, the fans did not give the ball back. Captain Wilson and Giordano were forced to go under the Curva Nord in an attempt to calm down the Laziali. The game was a farce and finished 1-1. In the last minutes there was a clear penalty for Lazio but the ref decided that there was no way he was going to make matters worse. A game and day nobody will forget.


Source Wikipedia

And Wilson never forgot it. Paparelli’s son in a recent interview stated that the Captain “was a constant presence in my life right from when I was little. I found it amazing that he always found the time to ring me on my birthday and on October 28. He told me he felt it necessary to go out there that day to try and calm the Lazio supporters. And he said that if they hadn’t played, there would have been more than just one death”.


In Serie A Lazio were not performing well. At the start of game 10 the Biancocelesti were in fourth place and only 4 points behind leaders Inter. But in the next 14 games Lazio won only once.


On March 23, 1980, Lazio went to Pescara. It was not a healthy atmosphere.


Rumours that there was something wrong in Serie A had begun to circulate earlier in the year. At Cagliari Maurizio Montesi broke his leg and from the hospital spoke to the few journalists who went to see how he was. He was alone, none of the Lazio players had had the decency to drop by. He started talking of match fixing, agreements between clubs over results, and illegal betting.


In Italy one could not legally bet on the result of a single game or on the scores of a series of games. There was just the Totocalcio where one had to guess the result of 13 games. There was however an illegal betting system called Totonero run by illegal bookmakers similar to how legal bets were organised in the UK.


Match fixing had always been a problem in Italy and taken place since the early 1950s. Clubs and/or players would agree to share points during the season in a “you scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours” system. But then the players started to bet on these games. It was easy money; they knew what the result would be so why not have a little wager.


Alvaro Trinca was the owner of a restaurant in the centre of Rome where Lazio and Roma players would often go and eat before games. Massimo Cruciani was a fruit seller and was very friendly with a number of players. Both would hear the players talk of match fixing and therefore started to bet and win large sums of money. They teamed up and devised a plan which was to offer money to the players to fix games as well as bet money for them.


Their plan failed miserably and they were hugely indebted with people with whom you do not want to be indebted with. Apparently they first asked the clubs for money but not all wanted to pay, then they presented their case to the Italian Football Federation but that was not going to solve the debts, so they then tried by resting their case with the law. They were later both arrested and started talking to the magistrates.


Back at Pescara, Lazio played abysmally and lost. The players knew that something was about to happen. At the end of the game, the carabinieri arrested Bruno Giordano, Lionello Manfredonia, Massimo Cacciatori and Wilson.


Lazio, thanks to Vincenzo D’Amico rising above everything and taking the team to a fundamental victory against Catanzaro, managed to avoid relegation.


Once the season finished there was the Sport Justice court case regarding the match fixing. The Lazio players were allegedly involved in the match fixing of Milan Lazio that ended 2-1 for the hosts and Lazio Avellino which finished 1-1.


The first sentencing between May and June gave Cacciatori and Wilson a life ban, Giordano and Manfredonia an 18 month suspension, Montesi four months and Lazio were fined 10 million lire. At the time fans thought that all in all this was acceptable.


Others had even worse sentences. Milan were relegated (there was a direct involvement of the club President), Avellino, Bologna and Perugia given a 5 point penalty. Among the various players, Enrico Albertosi got a life ban and Paolo Rossi 3 years.


The Lazio fans looked at the appeal case with optimism. They were wrong. Lazio were relegated to Serie B for the game against Avellino, Giordano and Manfredonia got a three and a half year suspension, Cacciatori 4 years and Wilson three years. Paolo Rossi’s suspension was reduced to two years, Albertosi to four.


Why were Lazio relegated? There was no legal reason since none of the club managers were involved. The only reason was the fact that first sentences were considered too lenient and the Sports Justice system wanted to set an example. Hence, Lazio, always everybody’s favourite scapegoat, were relegated because it had a large number of players involved. But others were involved far deeper and got off lightly or with no penalisation at all. Lazio were a sacrificial lamb to keep the media happy.


Were the players guilty? Who knows? Wilson has hardly ever spoken about it. In his official biography though, he admitted having reached an agreement with some Milan players regarding Milan-Lazio. The plan was to let them win in Milan and Lazio in Rome. The Biancocelesti did not have much of a chance in Milan and the points at the end of the season could have been useful in case of a battle to stay in Serie A. He had nothing to do with betting, as also shown in the case files and his name appeared only for the Milan match. But Montesi accused him of being the ring leader, of having offered him money to lose games. Wilson always denied and as a matter of fact there is no mention of Wilson for the Avellino game. He was accused only of having set up Milan-Lazio.


These types of agreements had always happened in Italian football, this was no different from other similar ones like in the last matches of the season when one team needed a point to stay in Serie A and the other maybe a point for a UEFA Cup qualification. The games would practically be non-starters. This is a violation of every Sports Code, and if the agreement is reached among clubs, if found guilty, these should be relegated or given point deductions. And if it is between players, these, if found guilty, should be suspended. If the players take money all that has to be done is to verify and check.


Manfredonia stated in an interview that he paid a rather large price compared to what he actually did. So maybe when Wilson announced that they were going to lose the Milan game, he complied. He did not play the match against Avellino, so he can’t have been guilty for that.


Giordano proclaims his innocence to this day. In his official biography he claims that Trinca and Cruciani tried to blackmail President Umberto Lenzini who refused to pay. When the magistrates asked him if he had got some extra cash Giordano denied it, saying “check my bank statements”. This is probably what they did and as a consequence none of the players were found guilty in the legal court case.


Where does the truth lie? A few facts are almost certain. Milan- Lazio was fixed by the players. The club had nothing to do with it. The rest is just speculation. Lazio, some Lazio players and Lazio fans paid a very high price for the Italian Football Federation's need to find guilty parties, whether they were actually guilty or not. And unfortunately it would not be the only time. Claudio Vinazzani’s friendship with a Neapolitan illegal bookie, who was fixing games, translated into a 9-point deduction for the 1986-87 season, despite Lazio not being involved. President Claudio Lotito’s requests for decent referees would cost Lazio a 30-point deduction in the 2005-06 season and 3 for the following one in the Calciopoli farce. Stefano Mauri’s friendship with a player who fixed games cost him a six-month suspension and jail time, even if he was innocent.


After the scandal Wilson went into a prolonged self-isolation. He was sick of the football world. He never forgave Montesi. While not mentioning him by name, the Captain in his biography, “I have never forgiven the procedural behaviour of an incoherent two-faced footballer of the time”.


After the amnesty following Italy’s World Cup win of 1982 in Spain, Wilson could have started to play again but he refused. The Lazio world wanted him back but he was not interested. He had a contract that would have allowed him to be General Manager once he retired but he tore it to bits. He went to North America to play for Inter Montreal in the Canadian Professional Soccer League but the club went bust during the season. He disappeared. A thirty-year voluntary exile.


On January 9 200, Lazio celebrated their centenary. He reluctantly came back to play with Chinaglia, D’Amico, Garlaschelli, Pulici, Oddi and maybe that feeling of belonging to something came back. The fans gave him a hero’s welcome.


More than 30 years later he was back on the pitch with his 1974 mates for a charity match and he started to be more involved, talking on the radio, releasing interviews. A couple of other games were organised between Lazio old glories and he was there, at least for the first 10-15 minutes. Then he’d be substituted by his son, James.


He died on March 5, 2022, leaving a huge void in the hearts of all Lazio supporters and in those of his team mates. He played 408 games for Lazio (286 in Serie A, 38 in Serie B, 58 in Coppa Italia, 10 in the UEFA Cup, 2 in the Fairs Cup, 2 in the Mitropa Cup, 6 in the Anglo Italian Cup and 6 in the Cup of the Alps) with 8 goals (6 in Serie A and one each in the Coppa Italia and UEFA Cup).


He was buried in the Maestrelli family tomb, alongside Giorgio Chinaglia.


Maestrelli, Chinaglia and Wilson, together for eternity.


Lazio Career

Season

Total games (goals)

Serie A

Serie B

Coppa Italia

UEFA Cup

Fairs Cup

Mitropa Cup

Anglo Italian Cup

Cup of the Alps

1969-70

39

28

-

1

-

-

2

4

4

1970-71

36

29

-

3

-

2

-

-

2

1971-72

48

-

38

10

-

-

-

-

-

1972-73

36

30

-

4

-

-

-

2

-

1973-74

42 (1)

30 (1)

-

8

4

-

-

-

-

1974-75

34

30

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

1975-76

40 (2)

28 (1)

-

10 (1)

2

-

-

-

-

1976-77

33 (1)

29 (1)

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

1977-78

38 (2)

30 (1)

-

4

4 (1)

-

-

-

-

1978-79

33 (2)

29 (2)

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

1979-80

29

23

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

Total

408 (8)

286 (6)

38

58 (1)

10 (1)

2

2

6

6

Sources


Vincenzo Di Michele: Pino Wilson – Vero capitano d’altri tempi; Fernandel 2013.

Giancarlo Governi: Bruno Giordano. Una vita sulle montagne russe; Fazi, 2017.

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